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Office Hours

If you’d like to chat with me about Turing, or software development, or career stuff, I’m quite pleased to do so. Just send an email to thompsonjoshd at Google’s popular email service, and we’ll set up a time to chat.

This page is entirely cribbed from robertheaton.com/office-hours. I liked his offer and reasoning, and am spinning up the same.

Why Should You Sign Up?

I think that these sessions will be most useful for “Beginner Beginners” and “Beginner Professionals” - people who are just starting to figure out how to learn software development, and people who have learned the basics and are working on getting their first software development job.

But regardless of what stage you are at, if you think that spending some time talking about programming and careers would be useful then I’d love to hear from you.

We can cover any topic that you like. Some example things I think I could help with include:

  • A specific concept doesn’t make sense and you’d like to talk it over
  • You’re working on a project, you’re stuck, and you’d like to get unstuck
  • You’re trying to decide what to learn about or work on next
  • You’re trying to figure out how to strategize about your job hunt
  • You’re wanting to really land a job at one specific company, or at most two

If you’re a member of a group that is underrepresented in the technology industry then I especially encourage you to get in touch.

How do you sign up?

Send me an email at [email protected] with a few sentences on who you are and what you’d like to work on. I’ll email you right back with whether I think I can help, and we can get scheduling.

What do I get out of this?

I’m working on a series of Turing backend prep material to help people make the difficult leap from beginner beginner to advanced beginner, and getting that first job, or get that first remote job.

This jump is hard enough when you have a background in tech, or have worked in technical roles, or have been tinkering with code since a child.

It can be absolutely diabolical if you don’t. I want to make my resources useful as possible, and the biggest part of doing that is talking to as many people working through them.

I’m also just a friendly guy who has had lots of people help him over the years.

see i'm normal

Who am I?

I’m a software developer at Proofpoint, where I work on tools that send simulated phishing attacks. I’ve written a lot of about programming and and remote work and the Turing school, and the best way to decide whether you might enjoy talking with me is probably to read a couple of those posts.

What do I get out of this?

I hope to echo the general direction and results of Robert Heaton’s experience, which he chronicled in Lessons from my first 20 office hours